Jeju 4.3 Reconciliation Conference: Grand Tragedy, Testimony and Tolerance

On Tuesday, April 17th at the University of Chicago's International House, a delegation of scholars and survivors came together to review and assess the effort to raise global awareness about Jeju 4.3, or the 1948 uprising on Korea's Jeju Island, and to make progress toward restorative justice, societal healing, and reconciliation.  This conference sought recommendations and resolutions for next steps toward health, healing and justice that will support and benefit not only Jeju 4.3 survivors and families, but also uplift Jeju globally as an environmentally and sustainable "Peace Island."  This may include the creation and operation of a Jeju Peace University or a Jeju Environmental University based on collaborative Jeju Peace Studies in Korea and internationally.  This initiative helps create a new comprehensive history that gives voice to the people and embrace concerns about dignity and autonomy.

The day's program featured various sessions including a Keynote Speech delivered by Peter U-il Kang (Bishop, Diocese of Cheju) and a presentation and performance by South Korean violinist and peace activist, Hyung Joon Won, Artistic Director of the Lindenbaum Festival Ensemble.

PROGRAM SCHEDULE:

11:00 am – 11:05 am

Opening Ceremony

 

11:05 am – 11:25 am

Keynote - Jeju 4.3 Reconciliation Through Religion: Comprehensive Understanding of 4.3 in Korean Modern History

 

Peter U-il Kang, Bishop, Diocese of Cheju, South Korea and Chair of Committee to Recommend Jeju 4.3 Peace Prize

 

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Session 1: Recognition and Responsibility of the Jeju 4.3 Grand Tragedy during “peacetime” Korea (March 1947-September 1954)

 

Recognition and Responsibility: The Moral Relevance of Pre-UN History to the Jeju Tragedy

Hope Elizabeth May

Central Michigan University, USA

The Graduate Institute of Peace Studies, Kyunghee University, Korea

 

Surviving the Cold War: Widows of Jeju 4.3 and Korean War Violence

Su-Kyoung Hwang

University of Sydney, Australia

 

U.S. Responsibility of Cheju Massacre 1947-1949 Revisited

Sang-Soo Hur

Korea Social Science Institute, Korea

 

Discussant:

Bruce Cumings

University of Chicago, USA

 

Discussant:

Kunihiko Yoshida

Hokkaido University, Japan

 

Moderator:

Chang Hoon Ko

Jeju National University, Korea

 

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Lunch

 

 


1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Session 2: Film Screening of “Shackled,” (made by Sangyong Hyun [Filmmaker, South Korea] and supported by the World Association for Island Studies) untold stories of Jeju 4.3 Survivors and their Testimonies

 

Moderator:

Dong-yun Yang

Jeju 4.3 Solidarity for Islanders

 

Moderator:

Ae-Duck Im

Jeju National University, Korea

 

Guest Speakers:

Ms. Yeong-ran Kim

Ms. Mi-kyoung Kang

Mr. Won-hew Pu

Mr. Dong-su Park

 

Discussants:

Donald Kirk, Author and Journalist, USA

Grant McCall, Anthropologist, Australia

 

3:00 pm – 3:10 pm

 

Break

3:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Session 3: Jeju 4.3 As A Source of a Sustainable “Peace Island” Policy Agenda

 

From Tragedy Will Come: Jeju is the Buckle with its “Peace Port”

Grant McCall

University of Sydney, Australia

 

Registering 1947 Records of Legal Cases of 328 People Involved the Demonstrations into one of the UNESCO World Programs of Memory

Chang Hoon Ko

Jeju National University, Korea

 

Placing Jeju Tragedies in Various Taxonomies of Reparations

Kunihiko Yoshida

Hokkaido University, Japan

 

Discussant:

Roy Tamashiro

Webster University, USA

 

Hyung joon Won

Artistic Director, Lindenbaum Festival Ensemble, Korea

 

Moderator:

Hope Elizabeth May

Central Michigan University, USA

The Graduate Institute of Peace Studies, Kyunghee University, Korea

 


4:00 pm – 4:10 pm

Break

 

 


4:10 pm- 5:00 pm

 

Session 4: Social Healing and Peace Education Cases of Jeju 4.3 Grand Tragedy

 

Bearing Witness to the Inhuman at Jeju 4.3: How Museums, Rituals and Pilgrimages Advance Healing and Reconciliation

Roy Tamashiro

Webster University, USA

 

Searching for a Social Healing Practice Model: Focused on Jeju 4.3 Historical Trauma

Ae-Duck Im

Jeju National University, Korea

 

An Overview of 4.3 Peace Education in South Korea

Michael Saxton, Jeju National University

Geum-soon Han, Nam Nyeong High School

Seung-hak Oh, Halla Middle School

Deok-hyeon Kim, Jeju National University

Jae-yong Shin, Jeju National University

 

Discussant:

Kunihiko Yoshida

Hokkaido University, Japan

 

Moderator:

Sang-Soo Hur

Korea Social Science Institute, Korea

 

5:00 pm – 5:10 pm

Break

 

5:10 pm -  5:25 pm

Jeju 4.3 Reconciliation Through Music by Hyung joon Won, Artistic Director, Lindenbaum Festival Ensemble

 

“Elegy for the Victims of Terrorism,” composed by In kyu Kim, a South Korean composer who wrote this piece in 2017 for Violinist Hyung Joon Won and to pursue peace on the Korean peninsula

 

“Cheju Island that Never Sleeps,” Composed and Lyrics by Ahn Chi-whan, South Korea

 

The philosophy of Lindenbaum Music is "One People, One Harmony." This philosophy enables us to bring people back together from discord through an understanding of orchestral music. Our basic principles of Consideration, Communion and Communication through orchestra guide us in the creation of expanded understanding and harmony between people in all places of the world.

 

5:25 pm - 5:30 pm

Closing Remarks

 

*PLEASE NOTE THAT THE PROGRAM SCHEDULE HAS RECENTLY CHANGED AND IS REFLECTED ABOVE. (As of April 10, 2018).  PLEASE CONTINUE TO CHECK BACK FOR ANY UPDATES!