Graduate Workshops

Graduate workshops offer students, faculty, and scholars the opportunity to exchange new research and participate in discussions about East Asia-related topics. Workshops are sponsored by CEAS and the University of Chicago Council on Advanced Studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Workshops take place for the entire academic year, and all are welcome to attend. Please check individual workshop websites below for current topics.

Art & Politics of East Asia

The Art and Politics of East Asia workshop provides a forum for students and faculty to meet and discuss the relationship between aesthetics and political economy in textual, visual, and performance media in East Asia. The major research concern of the workshop is to consider the politics out of which artistic works emerge, with an additional focus on the experience of modernity in East Asia societies.  Go to the workshop website.

This workshop meets alternate Fridays, 3:00-5:00pm in Judd Hall 313

Faculty Sponsors: Paola Iovene, Hoyt Long
Student Coordinator(s): Tom Kelly

East Asia: Politics, Economy & Society

This workshop focuses on current social science research on East Asia, particularly the People’s Republic of China, Korea, Taiwan, and Japan. The scope of the workshop is truly interdisciplinary, as we attract students and faculty from political science, sociology, economics, anthropology, history, international studies and various other areas. The workshop features presentations by university faculty members, graduate students, and guest speakers from other institutions working on East Asia. Graduate students are especially encouraged to present their thesis and dissertation research.

This workshop meets alternate Tuesdays, 4:00-5:30 pm in Pick Lounge

Faculty Sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao, Zheng Song
Student Coordinator(s): Junyan Jiang

East Asia: Transregional Histories

This workshop invites students, faculty and scholars from other academic communities to present creative and original work that speaks across the national lines of East Asia as well as the disciplinary lines of the academic community. Joint presentations among participants that incorporate multidisciplinary and/or transregional historical perspectives are especially encouraged.

While recognizing the continuing importance of the nation state in historical understanding, we believe that it is just as important to give exposure to themes of a transnational and regional or global nature that have been obscured by the national paradigm. Such approaches can prove particularly fruitful when undertaken at a level of understanding beyond traditional departmental and specialty boundaries. The workshop invites advanced students, faculty, and outside speakers and visitors from the humanities and social sciences to present papers on the topic of East Asia and its multiple and contending historical definitions.  Go to the workshop website.

This workshop meets alternate Thursdays, 4:00-6:00pm in Social Sciences 224.

Facutly Sponsors: Jacob Eyferth, Susan Burns
Student Coordinator(s): Guo Quan Seng

Theater & Cinema in East Asia

This workshop focuses on various operatic, theatrical and cinematic traditions in China, Japan and Korea. Over the course of the year, we aim to deepen our understanding of each individual performance-based art format and, more importantly, their affinity with each other, as well as the cultural and artistic influence across national boundaries in East Asia. Go to the workshop website.

Faculty Sponsors: Judith Zeitlin, Xinyu Dong
Student Coordinator(s): Naixi Feng

Visual & Material Perspectives on East Asia

This workshop is focused on the study of material and visual objects from East Asia (defined to include China, Central Asia, Korea and Japan, and other regions). It explores the possible uses of recent theories of art, history, and material and visual culture in the study of East Asia. Presentations of studies of objects and visual materials from a variety of historical periods and geographical concerns within East Asia serve as case studies for the exploration of such methodological concerns. The workshop is about two-thirds student presentations and about one-third outside speakers.  Go to the workshop website.

This workshop meets alternate Fridays, 4:00-6:00pm in CWAC 156

Faculty Sponsors: Hung Wu, Ping Foong, Chelsea Foxwell
Student Coordinator(s): Anne Feng