Department of History

Susan Burns

Associate Professor
Department of History
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Director, Center for East Asian Studies

1126 E 59th St
Social Sciences 221
Chicago, IL 60637
(773) 702-8934

Professor Burns focuses on 19th century Japanese history, specifically the period between the Tokugawa era and the end of the Meiji period, and also the role of Western medicine in the lives of Japanese women. For more information, visit Professor Burns's page at the University of Chicago's Department of History.


Guy Alitto

Associate Professor
Department of History
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

1126 E 59th St
Social Sciences 211
Chicago, IL 60637
(773) 702-8390

Professor Alitto is a specialist of modern Chinese intellectual history, and has also done extensive work on Chinese cultural history as it pertains to rural and village communities. For more information, visit Professor Alitto's profile at the University of Chicago's Department of History.

Guy Alitto

Bruce Cumings

Gustavus F. and Ann M. Swift Distinguished Service Professor
Department of History
Chair, Committee on Korean Studies, CEAS

1116 E 59th St
HM E 682
Chicago, IL 60637
(773) 834-1818

Professor Cumings is a specialist in twentieth century Korean history, and writes on contemporary international affairs. He is also the editor of the forthcoming Cambridge History of Korea. For more information, visit his page at the university's Department of History, or his page at The Nation magazine's website, where you can see his commentary on contemporary affairs.


Jacob Eyferth

Associate Professor in Chinese History
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Department of History

1050 E 59th St
Wieboldt 301H
Chicago, IL, 60637
(773) 834-1677

Professor Eyferth is an historian specializing in the non-elite peoples of China during the twentieth century, particularly the effects of industrialization, collectivization, and revolution on the lives of Chinese women. For more information, see his page at the university's Department of History.


James Hevia

Professor
Department of History

5845 S Ellis Ave
Gates-Blake Hall 116
Chicago, IL, 60637
(773) 834-7585

Professor Hevia's is an historian whose research has focused on empire and imperialism in eastern and central Asia. Primarily dealing with the British Empire in India and southeast Asia and the Qing empire in China, his specific concerns have been with the causes and justifications for conflict; how empire in Asia became normalized within Europe through markets, exhibitions, and various forms of public media; and how the events of the nineteenth century are remembered in contemporary China. For more information, see his page at the university's Department of History.

James Hevia

James Ketelaar

Professor
Department of History
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

1126 E 59th St
Social Sciences 513
Chicago, IL 60637
(773) 834-0763

James Ketelaar is an historian whose specialities include the religious, philosophical, and intellecutal history of Japan. He is currently finishing a book on the importance of the barbarian and the frontier in the construction of Japanese national identity and national history: Ezo: A History of Japan's Eastern Frontier (Princeton, forthcoming). Visit his page at the university's Department of History, for more information.


Kenneth Pomeranz

University Professor
Department of History

1126 E 59th St
Social Sciences 218
Chicago, IL 60637
(773) 834-4247

Professor Kenneth Pomeranz's work focuses mostly on China, though he is also very interested in comparative and world history, particularly long-term global economic trends. Most of his research is in social, economic, and environmental history, though he has also worked on state formation, imperialism, religion, gender, and other topics. His publications include The Great Divergence: China, Europe, and the Making of the Modern World Economy (2000), which won the John K. Fairbank Prize from the American Historical Association, and shared the World History Association book prize. For more information, see his page at the Department of History.


Johanna Ransmeier

Assistant Professor
Department of History and the College

1126 E. 59th Street
SS Box 74
Chicago, IL 60637

Professor Ransmeier researches local practices revealed in police and judicial records and the intersection of law and family life in modern China. Currently, she is completing a book on the practice of selling people in North China during the Late Qing and Republican periods, the first such work to be devoted to the subject of slavery and human trafficking in China during this period. Her research efforts within China’s judicial archives have also led her to new areas of interest extending beyond trafficking cases. For more information, visit her page at the university's Department of History.

Johanna Ransmeier